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Archive for January 2014

Multiple SVN repositories discussion

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From: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1761513/multiple-svn-repositories-or-single-company-repository

Personally I would definitely prefer separate repository per project. There are several reasons:

  1. Revision numbers. Each project repository will have separate revisions sequence.
  2. Granularity. With repository per project you just can’t make a commit into different projects having the same revision number. I assume this more as advantage, while someone would say that it is a flaw.
  3. Repository size. How large is your project? Does it have binaries under source control? I bet it has. Therefore, size is important – each revision of binary file increases size of the repository. Eventually it becomes clumsy and it’s hard to support. Fine-grained policy of binary files storage should be supported, and additional administration provided. As for me, I still can’t find how could I completely delete binary file (committed by some stupid user) and its contents history from repository. With repository per project it would be easier.
  4. Inner repository organization. I prefer fine-grained, very organized, self contained, structured repositories. There is a diagram illustrating general (ideal) approach of repository maintenance process. I think you would agree that it is just NOT POSSIBLE to use ‘all projects in one repo’ approach. For example, my initial structure of repository (every project repository should have) is:
    /project
        /trunk
        /tags
            /builds
                /PA
                /A
                /B
            /releases
                /AR
                /BR
                /RC
                /ST
        /branches
            /experimental
            /maintenance
                /versions
                /platforms
            /releases
    
  5. Repo administration. ‘Repository per project’ has more possibilities in users access configuration. It is more complex though. But there is also helpful feature: you can configure repositories to use the same config file
  6. Repo Support. I prefer backing up repositories separately. Somebody says that in this case it is not possible to merge info from one repo into the other. Why on earth you would need that? The case when such merge is required shows that initial approach to source control is wrong. Evolution of the project assumes subsequent project separation into submodules, not the other way. And I know that there is approach to do that.
  7. svn:externals. ‘Repository per project’ approach encourages svn:externals usage. That is a healthy situation when dependencies between project and submodules is established via soft links, which svn:externals is.Conclusion. If you want to keep source control simple, use one repository. If you want to make software configuration management RIGHT:
    1. Use ‘repository per project’ approach
    2. Introduce separate role of software configuration manager and assign team member to it
    3. Hire good administrator, who can cope with all subversion tricks 🙂

PS. By the way, in spite I work with SVN all the time and I like it, ‘repository per project’ approach is why I see DCVS systems more attractive from the repository organization point of view. In DCVS repo is the project by default. There is even no question ‘single vs multiple’ possible, it would be just nonsense.

(see some related posts: http://wordaligned.org/articles/how-to-mirror-a-subversion-repository

http://www.aliaspooryorik.com/blog/index.cfm/e/posts.details/post/clone-a-svn-repository-258

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/143130/how-to-synchronize-two-subversion-repositories

http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.7/svn.ref.svnsync.c.sync.html

http://blogs.collab.net/subversion/mirroring-repos#.UuxtMPa6p4E)

Written by youryblog

January 31, 2014 at 10:35 PM

Posted in IT, SW Eng./Dev.

U.S. Army Considers Replacing Thousands of Soldiers With Robots

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U.S. Army Considers Replacing Thousands of Soldiers With Robots

By Evan Ackerman Posted 22 Jan 2014 | 17:05 GMT http://is.gd/2m2y00

“At the current rate, the Army is expected to shrink from 540,000 people down to 420,000 by 2019. But at last week’s event, Gen. Robert Cone, head of the Army’s Training and Doctrine Command, offered some surprising details about the slim-down plans. As Defense News put it, he “quietly dropped a bomb,” saying the Army is studying the possibility of reducing the size of a brigade from 4,000 soldiers to 3,000 in the coming years. To keep things just as effective while reducing manpower, the Army will bring in more unmanned power, in the form of robots. From the Defense News story.”

Written by youryblog

January 23, 2014 at 1:35 PM

Posted in Business, Interesting, IT, News

Why Few Want to Be the CIO Anymore Computerworld, December 16

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From: http://careernews.acm.org/

Why Few Want to Be the CIO Anymore
Computerworld, December 16

In a Computerworld survey of 489 IT professionals conducted in August and September, only 32% said that they aspire to become CIO in the future. Politics, relatively low pay and a lack of prestige all register as deterrents. Yet there’s another reason for this shift in career thinking. Technology professionals are being recruited to work in marketing, logistics and other functions outside of IT as technology becomes more deeply embedded in virtually every aspect of the business. That trend is expanding the IT career path horizontally and creating multiple career bridges across organizations.

Many IT professionals today are spurning the CIO role because of the comparatively low status that the title carries at most companies. If people are going to work hard toward getting a C-level title, they want it to mean something. What a lot of people see is that CIOs don’t wield either the power or authority commensurate to a C-level title. Another big disincentive is that the office politics of the CIO role are perceived as endless and there’s not a lot of room for CIOs to push back against requests – companies simply want their systems to work.

The politics and power struggles don’t go unnoticed by the rank and file: IT staffers say they can’t help but notice how much time the CIO role requires. Many IT professionals, especially younger people, are unwilling to trade off having balanced work and home lives for the pursuit of the top spot. At the same time, an IT career path is no longer a straight career path. CIOs from healthcare, financial services and manufacturing tell a similar story. Fast-changing business processes, the need for speed, consumers’ appetites for customization, and ever-mounting government and industry regulation are all working to complicate day-to-day business. What they need internally are people in IT with business knowledge and deep industry expertise.
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Written by youryblog

January 7, 2014 at 6:15 PM

Computing Innovations Abundant in CNN’s 10 Ideas List The CCC Blog, December 19

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From: http://www.acm.org/membership/careernews

Computing Innovations Abundant in CNN’s 10 Ideas List
The CCC Blog, December 19

CNN’s list of 10 emerging ideas that have the potential to change our world included many that were based on computer science and the latest computing research. As CNN explains, these concepts have the potential to make us healthier, to keep us safer on the highways, and to help our computers think for themselves. That should be good news to educators who are looking for new ways to sell students on a career in computer science.

One technology mentioned by CNN was the emergence of flexible display screens as a viable option for personal electronics. And once the technology is perfected, the range of possibilities gets a whole lot broader. Another technology involves autonomous, self-driving cars. Automakers are already equipping cars with sensors that know when you’re about to collide into the car in front of you and can brake accordingly. Partially automated cars could be hitting the market by the end of the decade.

Computer science is also having an impact on the future of health and science. Wearable sensors might have been considered strange a few years ago, but now we’re used to devices like FitBits and sensor-filled smartphones monitoring our movements, tallying calories, observing sleep patterns and even tracking heart rate, blood-sugar levels and other vitals. The next step will be tiny sensors under our skin, coursing through our bloodstreams and implanted in our brains to collect valuable information about our health. Finally, CNN mentioned computers that actually know how to think and apply common sense the way humans do. A team at Carnegie Mellon University is training a computer program to think for itself, starting with pictures.
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Written by youryblog

January 7, 2014 at 6:13 PM

Posted in Interesting, Research